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Thread: Bandsawn

  1. #1
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
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    Bandsawn

    I've seen videos that show band mills cutting both ways with blades toothed on both edges. These were all huge stationary mills with 4" -6" bands.

    Why couldn't this be done on a smaller (portable) mill like maybe an LT10. I'm sure you'd need to beef up some parts , but the payback would be potentially doubling your output.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Re: Bandsawn

    Portable band mills have flanges on the back of the guide bearings that keep the band from getting pushed off the drive wheels during a cut. They work just like the stops on a vertical shop bandsaw. I don't know how you would be able to keep a band on the drive wheels during the reverse cut without that stop flange. The band doesn't run against it constantly but if you encounter a harder-than-average area during a cut (like a knot) it will temporarily contact the flange until you slow down the feed rate.


    Even if it could be engineered, I don't think you would come anywhere near doubling your output on a manual mill, either. Especially if sawing alone, the majority of the time is spent loading logs onto the mill, turning logs/cants and clamping them in place. The actual sawing is the easiest and quickest part of the operation...the most fun, too.
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
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    Re: Bandsawn

    Thanks, Cody. Log handling is a major concern in my quest to acquire a mill of my own.

    As to my original question, I was hoping someone here had some exposure to a double edged mill and could educate me. You hit the nail on the head though. Whether coming or going, the blade is gonn'a backup a bit when it hits a harder than usual spot.

    Are you back in TX now?
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  4. #4
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    06-19-2010
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    Re: Bandsawn

    No, I'm offshore Mexico.
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
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    Re: Bandsawn

    I suspect such a double sided blade would get dull prematurely. The saw teeth on the back of the blade would drag their sides againt the wood and gradually get duller.
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