+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Jointer woes

  1. #11
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
    Location
    Österbotten Finland
    Posts
    636

    Re: Jointer woes

    In a distant past Delta tools were mostly manufactured in USA by a company called Rockwell. They have all been chineese for quite a few years.

    In your situation my method of jointing starting from the middle of the board planing towards the ends would be very appropriate. Try it..... but be careful!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  2. #12
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Gods country -- New England
    Posts
    7,891

    Re: Jointer woes

    Yeah - that paints a little different picture.

    I am wondering now about the part where you say it is hard to hold it up on the infeed and on the out feed. I can understand that. I would not be able to hold it up and still have good control with it.

    Is it possible to set up a roller stand on the infeed side and the outfeed side to help you hold it up? You would need to be careful that the rollers be set very precisely so as not to influence the action of jointing.

    Right now - it IS possible that the difficulty in holding it up is influencing the jointing action.
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  3. #13
    Join Date
    06-15-2010
    Location
    Lindale, TX
    Posts
    3,029

    Re: Jointer woes

    Yeah, I'm afraid that you could possibly have your jointer set up perfectly and still be having the cupping issue because of the size and weight of the board. I upgraded my jointer because of the capacity issue of a 48" machine. As a rule of thumb you can properly joint a board that is 2x as long as your infeed table. If you check a straight edge on your board over 24" you'll not see much cupping at all. I got very good at jointing long boards on a short jointer, but I'd still have to do some hand planing to finish off boards the size that you're dealing with to get them to joint up with no gaps. Leo's suggestion of roller stands may help and TW's method of jointing from the middle works if you're comfortable with it being safe and controllable. Otherwise, if you're in the East Texas area, you can bring your stock over to my place and we'll run it on my big jointer.
    Mark


    "Merely having an open mind is nothing; the object of opening the mind, as of opening the mouth, is to shut it again on something solid." G.K. Chesterton
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  4. #14
    Join Date
    08-01-2010
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    314

    Re: Jointer woes

    Is it not possible to add an outfeed extension table? Excuse my ignorance as I only have experience on a very small, portable jointer with rather short pieces. Personally I don't like roller outfeeds because if they're not perfectly perpendicular they will cause your piece to walk/creep sideways. If going that route I'd suggest the flip up style, like this:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	25e93e61-03f1-4de8-b1a4-51a366675f62_300.jpg
Views:	32
Size:	4.5 KB
ID:	22139
    Last edited by ThisIsMatt; 09-09-2015 at 10:10 pm.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  5. #15

    Re: Jointer woes

    Thanks for all the support and suggestions. I think the safest thing I can do is to use my largest hand plane to try to get the cup out. I have tried a roller support and it is making matters worse. The start at the center is just not something I want to experiment with.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  6. #16

    Re: Jointer woes

    Quote Originally Posted by TW View Post
    Are you absolutely sure that the outer ends of the tables don't droop?
    Delta translates as China and I have learned to be a bit sceptical against tools coming from that country.

    Do shorter boards get staight?
    If so the jointer is probably correctly set up.

    Leo describes the jointing techique perfectly. It is always difficult to joint pieces that are much more than twice the length of the outfeed table. They tend to become a bit concave along the lengh. Even on my 2,3m (7' 6") long jointer I run into trouble with boards much over 7 feet in length. Jointing longer boards is possible but not easy.

    One way to remove the concavity is to start jointing from the middle by carefully dropping the board on the cutterhead and then push it through to the end. Then turn the board end over end and start in the middle and push through the other end. That would remove more wood towards the ends of the board and straighten the curve.
    Be careful when you do this and make sure you have a good grip on the board over the infeed table where a possible kickback would drag your hands away from the finger-eating cutterhead. Also make sure that there is nobody in the line of fire at the end of your jointer. If you are careless you may get one hell of a kickback.
    Some people say this method is too dangerous. I use it now and then but only with care.
    My 50" straight edge arrived. Yes, the outfeed table droops. I have read the setup instruction but can't get the end of the outfeed table high enough to be level.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts