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  1. #1
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
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    365

    CNC Wood Inlay Practice Using Inkscape and Jscut

    I did some testing yesterday to get the basics down on doing simple inlays using free software. It works pretty well. Still need to fine tune the process, but very doable. I can see lots of uses for this.

    The little 'trick' to making this work with Inkscape is to use the 'linked offset' function and then the 'break apart' function to separate them. The video shows the process.







    Dan
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Gods country -- New England
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    7,883

    Re: CNC Wood Inlay Practice Using Inkscape and Jscut

    Fantastic video Dan.

    Those 2 software programs look really good.

    Love the inlays
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
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    365

    Re: CNC Wood Inlay Practice Using Inkscape and Jscut

    Thanks Leo. Fun stuff.

    Dan
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    Re: CNC Wood Inlay Practice Using Inkscape and Jscut

    I watched the video last night - great stuff, Dan!

    So the offset - do you know exactly what that's doing for you? Does jscut need it to account for the tool diameter or something?
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
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    365

    Re: CNC Wood Inlay Practice Using Inkscape and Jscut

    Thanks. The slight offset is pretty much the tool diameter (+/-). When I've tried to do it without using the linked offset the actual cut piece is is a smidge too large and won't go into the pocket no matter how much I pound on it. Not sure exactly why but it is what it is. Could be the thickness of the stroke or one of several other things. I've been just eyeballing it for practice, but it would be possible to determine the exact offset ratio/number and once the pieces are broken apart to re-size the insert/inlay accordingly.

    Dan
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