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Thread: Mortiser DIY

  1. #1
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    06-22-2010
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    Mortiser DIY

    I'm looking for mortising setup. I already have a Steel City chisel mortiser. It's OK as far as a bench top machine goes but I've got an idea for something better. If I could get my hands on a mortising setup that was powered with a router motor and a collet setup to accept router bits. The base would be a precision x-y cross slide vice to hold the parts.




    The current motor is 1/2hp; 120v; 5.6 amp running at 1725 rpm. Is there a way to rewire this motor to give me 15,000 plus rpm? I'd also need to up the HP to at least 2 hp. Can this be done? The drill chuck would be replaced with a setup for router collets and bits. I can pick up the cross slide from Enco, Grizzly or other vendors of machine shop supplies.


    What do you guys think? Am I on to something orwhat?
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  2. #2
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Art,

    BTDT

    I bought a Grizzly horizontal drill ($600 or so). It does what you describe. The bit turns too slow. I do use it to make precision positioned mortises. It does a fair job using a plunge-able 3/8" router bit. It does a better job than my Shop Fox chisel mortise.

    That's the good news.

    The bad news is that you have to really play with the cutting. One eighth at a time, overlap holes and finally clean out the webs between. A real PITA.

    Final analysis

    Would I do it again? In a word, NO!
    Rich
    Huntington Beach, California

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  3. #3
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Thanks for the reply.
    Question: what rpm were you working with? Were you using a collet to hold the bit, or just the drill chuck?

    I'd really like build around the design of a typical bench top mortiser. I'm wondering if I could replace the present motor with one that would run somewhere above 15000 rpm. Then I would add a collet chuck and cross vise to hold the material and move the part through the cut.

    I LOVE building with M&T joints. Over I the years I've used every get by setup imaginable - and dreamed of the perfect of what the "perfect" mortiser. I keep going back to the adove design. I've also wondering if a drill press could be modified the same way. If I could find a small vertical mill that would run at router speed it would be perfect since they come standard with a working vise. Alas I've never found one that ran higher than about 3000 rpm. Maybe I could rewire/gear a small Bridgeport for this. That would be great if I could get the high speed w/out loosing the low end. That way I could mortise wood and mill metal on the same machine.

    Dreams can be tormenting if you can't fulfill them.

    '
    Last edited by art3427; 03-25-2015 at 3:27 pm.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  4. #4
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Art,
    The RPM is either 1750 or 3450. (Typical 60 Hz motor)

    The router bit is held with a chuck.

    It gets worse.

    I had to move the table up about 3 inches so that I could do mortises. The fence had to be replaced because it was about 3/8 high. I used the blade from an adjustable square to replace the fence. (About 1/8 thick) I also had to weld the table bracket to the support upright for stability.

    As I said I wouldn't do it again. If I could figure out how to mount a router in place of the electric motor I would. But then the higher speed and exposed bit just scares the poop out of me.

    The whole thing works but is underwhelming. After all the screwing around I understand why the David Marks Multi-router costs so much. I would probably buy the Multi-router if I did mortises on a production basis.

    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/m...model101l.aspx
    Rich
    Huntington Beach, California

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  5. #5
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Why not this? (hat tip to our very own Stretch):

    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
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  6. #6
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by Beamer View Post
    Why not this? (hat tip to our very own Stretch):

    If the job I'm currently bidding comes through, I'll be building a heavier duty version of this.
    Mark


    "Merely having an open mind is nothing; the object of opening the mind, as of opening the mouth, is to shut it again on something solid." G.K. Chesterton
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  7. #7
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Quote Originally Posted by Beamer View Post
    Why not this? (hat tip to our very own Stretch):



    Thanks Beams, I've considered a horizontal approach. However, I just like to see the bit when it's working. It's just that I've always been somewhat of a "different stroke" kinda' guy.


    I think I've about got it figured out - in my head anyway. I've also got everything I need to do a complete build onhand . . . . except a danged ole' round tuit.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  8. #8
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Art,
    There is one in Work Bench. (Way back)

    I have it on paper. If you want I'll scan it and send it to you.
    Rich
    Huntington Beach, California

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  9. #9
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    04-01-2014
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    Have you looked at overhead routers? They come up often and cheaply on eBay in the UK
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  10. #10
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    11-17-2010
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    Re: Mortiser DIY

    This is a Davis and Well horizontal boring machine with a Felder XY table. It is slow speed, relatively speaking, but the mortises are absolutely perfect and I can hold a conversation while using it.

    The problem with any router-based mortise is that the cut is always composed of 1/2 climb cut. The bit then naturally pulls into the cheek of the mortise. Shallower cuts help to minimize this, but the result then is a potential to wallow the mortise with repeated passes. Not a big deal if you cut your mortise then size your tenon to it, as it proper workflow. It is also important to eliminate any slop in the XY mechanism.
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    Last edited by pwjacobs; 03-29-2015 at 6:58 pm.
    Paul
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