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  1. #1
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Sundance, Wyoming
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    1,307

    Heat resistant walls?

    I've been cleaning my woodshop these last couple weeks (long project, very messy) anyway I have had this barrel stove here in the shop for the 14 years since I built the shop and in the last few years the sheetrock is cracking on the seems and the mud has popped out of the screw heads in some spots, there is also a soft spot in the wall that looks bubbled (second photo about center of the picture), like it got wet but no water has ever been higher than the floor (leak around the chimney, got that fixed).

    I just sprayed the barrel stove and chimney with some high heat paint, normally I have a 20" box fan on the floor by the back of the stove along with a pedestal fan that are plugged into a thermostatically controlled outlet (set for 70° to kick the fans on if over 70°)
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    I'm kind of concerned about the walls by the stove now. The walls are 2x6's on 2' centers with fiberglass insulation covered with plastic then this 1/2" sheetrock. I was thinking of several ideas and wanted to see what you all thought would be the best thought (or get other thoughts).

    1. get some 5/8" sheetrock and just screw it on top of this 4 foot up the wall.

    2. screw some 1x2's or 2x2's to the wall, put a 2x4 on the floor and set the sheetrock on it and screw to the wall leaving a gap between the rock and the floor for air to pass threw, also 4' up open on top.

    3. Screw some cement board directly over the sheetrock.

    4. same as #2 but with cement board.

    Which one do you think would be best?
    Or do you have a better idea?

    Thanks ~Mike
    If at first you succeed, try to hide your astonishment.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Gods country -- New England
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Mike,

    The sheet rock is paper lined - don't use it.

    I would encourage you to tear the sheet rock off the walls in that corner.

    When you get down to the studs you can put some thin metal on top of the studs - if you are totally anal - worst than me.

    Really though - tear off the sheet rock.

    Put the cement board up in place of the sheet rock. Mud the wall with compound - sand and paint.

    Next - Use some cement board and put up spacers, spaced on top of the studs - vertical like the studs. Leave 2" up from the floor for air flow - up to about 6' high from the floor. Make the spacers double thickness to get 1" total spacer thickness. The spacers should be about 2" wide.

    Then put up a layer of cement board on top of the spacers. Leave a space from the floor 2" to allow air flow. Mud with compound - sand and paint. This gives you a double wall with an airflow between.

    If you REALLY wanna get safe - make a sheet metal heat shield around he sides of your stove. Stand off the stove about 1-1/2 inches, paint flat black with heat resistant paint.

    On the trim around the door - make a sheet metal heat shield and space it 1" away from the wood trim.

    At THAT - the wood studs will never feel any heat from the stove.

    Anything less than that and Leo will NEVER agree that you are safe.

    You might be "lucky" - but NOT safe.

    This is what I did with my wood stove install. If you want pictures I will get them for you.

    To me - it's a small price to pay. I watch the stuff you do - I never comment, cept to say WOW. You always do a quality job - do it again on this project. This is the first time ever that I have really had anything to say.
    Last edited by Leo Voisine; 10-16-2014 at 11:18 pm.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
    Location
    Lacaster Pa
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    460

    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Tear off the rock and lay brick. or cement board then wire mess and thin stone.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
    Location
    Österbotten Finland
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    That looks scary......... you have a risk for an unwanted fire outside the stove.
    I would leave the gypsum board in place and build outwards from it. After all it still does a pretty good job holding the insulation in place.

    In my part of the world there are two standard sulution to this problem:
    -A brick wall built up against the gypsum board.
    -Two layers of cement board mounted with long wood screws through spacers made from pieces of iron pipe. This means that there will be free airflow between the gypsum board and the first layer of cement board and also between the first and the second layer of cement board. This way the heat that radiates against the wall is ventilated out before it reaches the flammable studs inside the wall.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Sundance, Wyoming
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    Okay, got'er done.

    Well it's not exactly like I would have liked but no one in town had light walled 1½" square tubing so I just used construction grade 2x4's ripped down to 2x2's, 3, 3" long blocks per stud over the sheetrock, about and inch from the edges up and down and one slightly above center, screwed the metal to those. I set the metal on some bricks I had as I installed the sheets, that gave me about 1¾" off the floor. I got 3 sheets 12' long and cut them in half to 6' tall.
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    before putting this up the sheetrock in the hot spots had reached temps as high as 290°F with a non-contact thermometer.

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    I used an indoor/outdoor thermometer with the probe hanging from a wire where the hot spot was before. The stove temperature is about 475°F, I generally don't run it that hot, usually about 350°F, after waiting for the probe temp to stabilize I was getting a reading of 158°. I double checked that with 2 different non-contact thermometers and the numbers were all within a couple degrees of the probes.

    Then I dropped it down behind the metal in the same place.
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    With the stove temp still around 450 - 475° behind the wall I got a reading of 93°.
    I plugged my fans in and the temp dropped a couple more degrees. I have a thermostat from an attic fan that I replaced set so the fans come on and go off at about 75°

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    I had it setup like this for 14 years without the heat shield and never really had any problems it was just that the sheetrock had cracked on the joints by the stove, (I think more from the heating and cooling and drying it out so much) and it made me wonder about over heating the walls, but now I feel pretty comfortable with this setup.

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    I should probably have put a color changing led strip light just behind the metal at the top, set it for red in the winter and blue in the summer (make a guy feel warmer or cooler ;-) )

    Anyway it feels safer to me now.

    What do you think?

    Thanks ~Mike
    If at first you succeed, try to hide your astonishment.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Pretty good solution, Mike!

    It also has a unique appearance to it. Good solving!
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Gods country -- New England
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Mike that is a whole lot better now.
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    12-07-2011
    Location
    Piedmont, SD
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Sweet, now I won't be worrying about burning down your shop if your not there.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Lighted

    I know it's goofy but I just couldn't stand it, I put a 16.4 foot LED RGB light strip behind my heat shield. I can change it to just about any color I want, I figure red for winter and blue for summer so it feels warmer in the Winter and cooler in the Summer.
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    Their operating temp is listed at -4°F threw 140°F. I think they will be okay, with the stove temp at 475°F where the strip is, holds around 100°F. I guess time will tell if they will hold up to the heat.

    I already had a white LED strip light I ran along my garage door track that I leave on all the time, throws enough light that I can see to walk threw without turning the other lights on.

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    Combined with them both running all the time it draws around 3 amps.

    What do you think?

    Thanks ~Mike
    If at first you succeed, try to hide your astonishment.
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  10. #10
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    06-19-2010
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    Re: Heat resistant walls?

    Crazy - but I think it's cool
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
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