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  1. #1
    Got these for my birthday and would like more information about them. The smaller is ratcheted and is marked Keen Kutter. The other has no markings, is about three feet long, and appears to be designed to hang.
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    Last edited by Wrangler; 07-24-2014 at 6:48 pm.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
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    Re: I need help in identifying these drills

    Where I grew up the first one was called a "joist drill" It was used for drilling holes through floor joist to run pipes/wires through. Common users were plumbers and electricians. Its was designed to fit between closely spaced timbers and be turned by cranking the elongated handle.

    The second? I'll take a guess. It appears to be a small portable drill press. Note the drilll head does not descend into the material. Instead, the material is cranked into the bit by rotating the bottom knob. This would allow for drilling pockets (not thru holes) with some degree of precision.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  3. #3
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    Re: I need help in identifying these drills

    I think thar art is right.

    It would be nice to have a joist drill like that. If fitted with a new three jaw chuck it might become very practical for certain uses.
    If it is strong enough it would be the ultimate tool for drilling peg holes when repairing log houses. When working is confines spaces without enough vertical room for the power drill nor enough horizontal room to swing the arms of the old T-auger. That is a pretty common situation in my job.

    I think that the little drill press would drill through holes as well if you place a piece of wood behind the part to be drilled. Anyway It is pretty outdated in this era of power drills.
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  4. #4
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    Re: I need help in identifying these drills

    Did some research. The first tool is called by different names by different manufacturers. Millers Fall called them Sill Braces. Stanley named them Corner Braces. There are a few for sale on Amazon/eBay and they are, IMO, reasonably priced.

    The little "drill press" thingy still has me stumped. Will l keep looking.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  5. #5
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    Re: I need help in identifying these drills

    Is it possible the "drill press" is a DIY project cobbled together from salvaged parts? It strikes me as odd that there are no markings on it when there is plenty of space for manufacturer ID.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by art3427 View Post
    Is it possible the "drill press" is a DIY project cobbled together from salvaged parts? It strikes me as odd that there are no markings on it when there is plenty of space for manufacturer ID.
    I'll have to look at it more carefully, but you very possible could be right. It was assembled with stove bolts, which fits with farm fabrication than manufacture.
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