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  1. #1
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
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    Jackson, MS
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    2,967

    Stanley Bailey types

    Bought myself a #5 & #6 this weekend. Gave $80 for the pair. At first that seemed kinda' pricey until I examined them a bit. Both were in NIB condition (but no box ) A little research revealed there were different "types" of each model.

    How do I find the "types" I bought? Also, previous owner tried to "restore" them by spraying everything but the sole with black paint. Due to excellent condition All I can think is he was trying to cover some very minor
    surface stains. How do I find out what their original colors were?

    Thanks in advance for the info I know I'll get from you guys!
    Last edited by art3427; 04-01-2014 at 5:54 pm.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    06-15-2010
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
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    3,868

    Re: Stanley Bailey types

    Oh, man... you don't know about Patrick's B&G yet!

    Happy reading...

    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html
    -- Tim --

    What???
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
    Location
    Österbotten Finland
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    636

    Re: Stanley Bailey types

    The price sounds fair to me.

    If they are Bailey planes and not Handyman nor any other secondary line of bench planes the paint was black. The used a kind of paint that was called Japanning. This was used on the inside of the body and all the frog except the mating surfaces agains the blade and against the body.

    The depth adjuster wheel is made from brass (except on some war time models) and was left unpainted. The lever cap was nickel plated on newer planes with red paint around the name Stanley on the front. Older lever caps apparently were plain cast iron.

    The wooden handles on older planes were made from Brazilian rosewood and probably oiled. Newer planes had beech handles thickly covered in some kind of hard varnish with black stain mixed into it. That warnish always flakes off over time so I prefere to redo it with boiled linseed oil though it does not look wery good with oil over partially removed stain.

    The blade and chipbreaker and lateral adjustment lever were plain steel.


    In my oppinion too many people spend too much time researcing plane typology instead of working wood. In my oppinion all Bailey planes made between 1902 and 1948 and maybe all the way to 1961 are likely to be at a minimum fairly good planes. Good individial planes do turn up among later British made Stanley planes as well though their quality got more uneven over time until it finally nosedived in the very early 1980-ies.
    Here is a link to a type study concerning US made Bailey planes:
    http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/
    Last edited by TW; 04-02-2014 at 10:51 am.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
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    Re: Stanley Bailey types

    As TD said, read up on the blood and gore. Great reading, fun, and very imformative.


    Quote Originally Posted by TW View Post
    In my oppinion too many people spend too much time researcing plane typology instead of working wood.


    TW,
    for me, the reason to research the type is to understand the history. The evolution of the plane from a very basic, but solid, type 1 up to the type 11 that seemed to be the best combo. Then as it slid back down a bit in quality. Then the fact the wartime planes have hard rubber knobs is so cool because the brass was all used in the war effort to make shells. For me, it is not so much about "I have a type XYZ" but more about, "This plane is 110 years old, has been handled by who knows how many people, and was made this way because of XYZ."
    I would also guess that for most of us amateur woodworkers that started with a crappy craftsman table saw and radial arm saw, BEFORE understanding and using hand tools, the history is very important. It connects us to our "knuckle-dragging forebears" and makes us appreciate the project more.


    maybe its just me...


    john
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
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    Österbotten Finland
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    Re: Stanley Bailey types

    All humans have the birthright to be different. After reading your explanation I can understand why you do what you do though I would not do it myself.

    Actually I do use the type studies to identify whether an oddlooking plane is a cobbled together mishmash of leftover parts or just a type that I haven't seen before...... so I do confess that sometimes I make use of the knowledge accumulated by people like you mapleman.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
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    Re: Stanley Bailey types

    Quote Originally Posted by TW View Post
    All humans have the birthright to be different. After reading your explanation I can understand why you do what you do though I would not do it myself.

    Actually I do use the type studies to identify whether an oddlooking plane is a cobbled together mishmash of leftover parts or just a type that I haven't seen before...... so I do confess that sometimes I make use of the knowledge accumulated by people like you mapleman.


    TW, heck, I don't know anything. I just read what others have figured out. Then quickly forget it
    But you are right - everyone of us is unique. The other thing, for me, is that I don't get to do as much WWing as I would like, so sometimes I need to get a fix with information about WWing or about a tool. Reading is cheaper than buying another tool that I would just neglect


    john
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