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  1. #11
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
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    Tyler, Texas
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    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    Quote Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
    For wiping I use a lint free "T" shirt type fabric, folded into a neat square pad.
    +1
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
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    Gods country -- New England
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    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    Quote Originally Posted by Bean View Post
    I have some MINWAX Polyurethane I'd like to spray onto a few boat paddles I'm fininishing. Can anyone suggest a good mix ratio and working PSI? Also, if I have a surface painted with a rattle can PAINT, are there any issues with spraying polyurethane over that? Will it adhere well? Thanks in advance.
    First question I would ask is ---- It poly good to use for a boat paddle. Going into the water!!

    Poly is generally used as an outdoor coating as it is is not made for the weather - even worst - being used in the water.

    A good marine spar varnish might be better. Something like Epiphanes - not Helmsman.

    As a wipe on finish - I also use a "neatly" folded clean tee shirt - and often a silky cloth material if I can get it.

    But - the spar varnish on a boat paddle will be better than minwax poly. Read the can of poly and see what it says about outdoor use.
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
    Location
    So. Florida
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    324

    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    First question I would ask is ---- It poly good to use for a boat paddle. Going into the water!!

    Poly is generally used as an outdoor coating as it is is not made for the weather - even worst - being used in the water.

    A good marine spar varnish might be better. Something like Epiphanes - not Helmsman.

    As a wipe on finish - I also use a "neatly" folded clean tee shirt - and often a silky cloth material if I can get it.

    But - the spar varnish on a boat paddle will be better than minwax poly. Read the can of poly and see what it says about outdoor use.
    You must have missed his post:

    Quote Originally Posted by Bean View Post
    The paddles are purely decorative/millitary type, so they won't be going into the water, i'm sure someone is wondering why i care so much about the finish on a paddle, that would be the reason, of course even if it were going to be used in the water, i'd still want a nice finish.
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    07-13-2010
    Location
    Beaufort, SC
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    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    Yea they won't be going into the water at all...I hope, I guess i'm not sure what happens to them after I give them away! lol I hope they don't go into the water. But i just wanted to share that I have just come back in from the shop (garage) and I am in love with my spray gun! Turns out that poly was thin enough already to put right into the bottle and spray, I have only got one coat on a couple of paddles and it looks amazing already! I can't wait to see it finished. I used the Minwax poly right out of the can at about 50 PSI. Someone suggested that I coat the painted paddle (I painted one white with a wal mart rattle can) with shellac prior to applying the poly. Is there any particular reason for this? I figured the spray paint filled all the pores on the wood surface and the shellac wouldn't have anything to soak into? I'm holding off on spraying that paddle for now. Thanks for all the help!
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  5. #15
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    05-31-2010
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    The biggest reason to put shellac between paint and poly is that the solvent in the poly can have drastic effects on your paint while it's wet. The shellac keeps those things from happening.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
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  6. #16
    Join Date
    07-13-2010
    Location
    Beaufort, SC
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    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    Thanks for the info Jason. I got a can of shellac last night and layed down a coat over that particular paddle. I have to say that it looks really good with just the shellac on it. Those other two paddles are ready for another coat of poly anyway, so i think i'll just spray them all at the same time and put a coat of poly over top the shellac and see how that looks. As soon as I get one done i'll put a picture of them on here.
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  7. #17
    Join Date
    11-19-2017
    Location
    southern california
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    1

    Re: Spraying Polyurethane

    I realize this thread is quite old but it is still popping up on google search, so I thought I'd add my 2 cents to see if it helps someone someday.

    I'm going to try and attach a couple of images of my home made spray booth, which has served me well over the last decade or so. It is just a folding cardboard barrier (5 panels) that I can set up in minutes (cleaning the garage before setup is the hard part). I have a cut out in the center panel that I roll a fan (see under the table) covered by furnace filter fabric. It is a 24" explosion proof fan that moves a lot of air. I roll up the garage door just high enough for it to exhaust and keep the drafts down (and bugs out). I cover the floor with cardboard too, before moving the project in.

    I often spray oil based poly with an HVLP sprayer. I like oil based poly for areas that will get a lot of abuse, like kitchen cabinets or in this case a bathroom vanity. It does take some time to mask the project and in this case disassemble the project so only the areas you want sprayed get hit. But once you're ready finishing takes minutes. A good HVLP sprayer is key for oil based poly. I originally had a low end sprayer ($200) and it did not atomize properly. When I did my first custom kitchen I invested in a 4 turbine 3M PPS system and it works great for everything short of latex paint. As one other poster mentioned spraying gives you a very uniform finish...ie no brush marks or streaks.

    I always spray gloss for the first 2 coats and then shoot the sheen coat (satin or semi) depending on what the project demands for the final coat. Gloss has no additives or flatteners that cloud the finish. In this picture the customer requested quartersawn oak and the poly really brings out the grain (although I hate the design they had me build...straight out of the 80's). I spray the first 2 coats about 2 hours apart. Then wait overnight and level out the finish with fine scratch pad and 320 sanding block (lightly). Wipe everything down and spray the final sheen. Usually 2 light final coats, just for assured coverage, again about 2 hours apart. I won't reassemble for 24 to 48 hours to make sure the finish is hard enough to handle my touching it.

    Hope this helps someone. Give it a try and brushing will be reserved for projects that are left in the garage.
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