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Thread: Woodie planes

  1. #1
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    Woodie planes

    Bought myself an MKII honing guide from Lee Valley recently. I've spent the last 2 days putting a decent edge on all my metal planes. Man, it is unbelievable at the difference a little help can make in achieving a razor edge. I've got some really cheap ($3 - $5 price range) pocket planes that now shave like a razor. I start at 200 grit and work up 200, 300, 400, 600, 1000, 1200, 1500 and 2000 grit then polish off with a white buffing compound on a piece of 1/4" birch plywood.

    I'm about ready to start on my collection of woodies. Given they all have an embedded angle of 45 degrees, what should I make my primary angle? They will be used almost exclusively for final dressing wood panels. I will probably cut one for use as a scrub plane.

    Also, are woodies intended to be set bevel up or down?

    I love working with a good cutting plane. Having them helps relieve the limitations of a 13" planer.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  2. #2
    I agree with you totally about the Mark II. I can sharpen freehand; but the ease and repeatability with a good guide is worth the investment.

    I don't own a power planer, so my most appreciated limitation with hand planes is the lack of noise.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Woodie planes

    The few wooden bench planes that I have are used with the bevel down. If you consider that a very steep face angle of attack is 60 degrees, a 45 degree bedded bevel up edge would need to be honed at 15 degrees, which would be demolished after a single pass, not at all practical from a durability standpoint.

    Why would the bevel angle would be any different for 45 degree woody or a 45 degree metallic plane? To me the "correct" bevel angle is a compromise between edge durability, and ease of penetration into the work surface. I have settled on 30 degree edges for nearly all bevel up irons; IMO the 25 degree edge touted by Stanley breaks down too quickly for smoother use, and why would a fellow want to spend any more time than necessary touching-up edges?
    A 35 degree edge takes significantly more effort to penetrate hard woods, like oak and ash, in my experience.
    Last edited by dcarter636; 07-13-2013 at 10:58 pm.
    Dave

    Measure once... cut twice.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Woodie planes

    so, Dave, are you recommending a 30 deg. bevel down for my woodies?

    I reworked 3 #4 planes yesterday. Started from scratch with a totally new bevel and took them all to a razor's edge. All the embedded angles were 45 deg. I put a 25 deg. bevel on the irons and finished with barely visible micro-edge. I mounted them in the bevel up position and no matter what I tried they would not cut at all. So' I set them bevel down and tried again. With no more than the usual adjustments They cut like a hot knife in soft butter. Don't know why it works, but it does.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  5. #5
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    Re: Woodie planes

    Sorry Art, I meant 30 degree edges for all my bevel down planes. I agree that would not worth a hoot with the bevel up.

    Yes, I use 30 degree edges on 45 degree bedding, regardless of the plane body material.
    Dave

    Measure once... cut twice.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Woodie planes

    Dave, thanks for the clarification. I'm gonna' do the woodies at 30 deg. Haven't started them yet. Will try to send pics with the results when I'm finished.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  7. #7
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    Re: Woodie planes

    About 25 degrees is what I use for my wooden plane irons. They work well and hold up long enough for my work / the woods I use. You can always hone them a little higher than you grind them.
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  8. #8
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    Re: Woodie planes

    What's the iron's tilt angle? That's all-important as you decide on your iron's bevel angle. The iron's bevel should be a few degrees steeper than the tilt angle so it'll bite into wood. If they're equal, the bevel will rub and not bite. If the bevel's too square for its tilt angle, then only the heel of the bevel will rub and the edge won't even touch wood.

    It takes really a pretty low tilt angle before it's worth doing to bevel-up a hand plane. Like... less than fifteen degrees tilt.
    -- Tim --

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  9. #9
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    Re: Woodie planes

    Quote Originally Posted by TDHofstetter View Post
    What's the iron's tilt angle? That's all-important as you decide on your iron's bevel angle. The iron's bevel should be a few degrees steeper than the tilt angle so it'll bite into wood. If they're equal, the bevel will rub and not bite. If the bevel's too square for its tilt angle, then only the heel of the bevel will rub and the edge won't even touch wood.

    It takes really a pretty low tilt angle before it's worth doing to bevel-up a hand plane. Like... less than fifteen degrees tilt.


    TD, its good to hear from you again. As to "tilt" angle I'm unsure of your reference. Are you referring to the fixed angle of the block _ like the frog angle to sole on an iron plane? If so, them that is what I am referring to as the "embedded" angle.


    Remember, I'm from MS and we got our own way of saying things down hea.
    art

    He who works with his hands is a laborer;
    he who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman;
    he who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.

    St. Francis of Assissi
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  10. #10
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    Re: Woodie planes

    Quote Originally Posted by art3427 View Post
    TD, its good to hear from you again. As to "tilt" angle I'm unsure of your reference. Are you referring to the fixed angle of the block _ like the frog angle to sole on an iron plane? If so, them that is what I am referring to as the "embedded" angle.


    Remember, I'm from MS and we got our own way of saying things down hea.
    Yep, that'd be my reference. I'm not sure how standardized my term is - that's just the term that made the best sense to my mind as I was typing, and I didn't have a lotta' time to get it thought before my fingers finished typing it.
    -- Tim --

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