+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,100

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Woohoo!! I learned something!

    That looks great, Dan!

    Kudos on the painting process, too - that's how I prefer to do the painting as well. It looks like the blue tape did an alright job of masking, eh? I was chicken to try it (and it's kinda expensive on a big area) so I used contact paper on my FIL's sign. Works really well!

    Very good progress, Dan - looking good!
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  2. #12
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
    Posts
    206

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Thanks guys. I would be a lot further behind without the help and suggestions along the way.

    Yeah, the blue painter's tape worked fine for me for now. Real close scrutiny will show a slightly ragged line, but if you're back a foot or two it looks very clean. So the look of using the wrong size router bit is an interesting design; sorta looks like a barbed wire font or a little spooky.

    Jason - where did you get the contact paper? I looked at the local hardware store and didn't see any.

    Dan
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  3. #13
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,100

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    I think i got mine in the "shelf liner" department of either target or walmart. It's pretty cheap and seems to work quite well.

    It does leave a little residue behind, though.

    What I've been doing is the following process:

    1. Prep the board - flatten, sand smooth, etc.
    2. Spray shellac on it to seal it (1 decent coat is fine)
    3. Squeegee on the contact paper and get it super smooth and flat.
    4. Roller it down good and solid

    With my FIL's sign, the next step was to generate the standard Gcode for the v-carving, but I wanted to paint some of the fields. I won't ever be good with a brush, so I wanted to spray those parts and needed a way to mask them just right.

    To do this, I generated the standard v-carving gcode with vCarvePro. Then I opened up the resulting gcode file and, using my source code editor (i'm a programmer by day) I changed all of the Z moves to z0.000 - making the code effectively cut a flat shape, no depth at all.

    The reason for this is that there isn't a way to say "run exactly between these two vectors at a given depth just like if you were going to v-carve, but without changing the Z at all. This produces a slightly overlapped mask, enough to be cut away when you run the final v-carving at full depth and leaving you with a really crisp painted field.

    Then i took that code out to the machine...and mounted the panel to the table. Do this with stops so you can put the piece back on the machine in EXACTLY the same place later. I did this with a few stop blocks i mounted to the table and left them there until the whole process was done. Here is a point where Machine Coordinates and Work Coordinates would come in very handy (thanks leo!).

    5. Set Z-zero with the tool touching the surface of the contact paper
    6. Then told mach3 it was .003" above zero - this effectively moves the zero point 3 thou below the setting - just enough to cut through the contact paper. This took a little experimenting.
    7. Run the "flat" gcode to score all the shapes out.
    8. Mask off any "lines" you don't want filled with paint. This is a step i added after learning not doing so will end up with a pile of different color paint in areas that don't get cut away in the final v-carving. Mostly this comes up in the areas that are just single lines, not shapes - those end at a Z0.000 depth so any misalignment shows up. A little tape over all the single lines is all it takes to keep paint out of there until you're ready for it.
    9. Peel off all the shapes for a given color that I want to spray.
    10. Spray the selected color.
    11. Once dry, mask that color with tape and return to step 9 for the next color.
    12. Once all colors are sprayed and dry, peel off all masking
    13. Spray another coat of shellac to seal all the painted surfaces.
    14. Cover the whole part with mask again, as in step 3.
    15. Put the panel back on the machine where it was the first time.
    16. Get your zero point and cut the full-depth v-carving out.
    17. Spray another coat of shellac into the grooves (this helps prevent bleeding).
    18. Spray your v-groove color.
    19. Once dry, peel back the mask and spray one more coat of shellac to seal everything good.
    20. Spray on final finish as desired (i used lacquer for my FIL's sign).



    Nothin, to it, eh?

    Maybe one day I'll do a video series of the whole process - i think that'd be helpful to some folks, maybe?
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  4. #14
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,100

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    OH - the shelf liner residue ... it comes up easily with just a little mineral spirits. But lots of spray paints will run if you use that - this is why so many coats of shellac.

    I've got an air brush now and will be spraying alcohol-based acrylics instead so i shouldn't need as much shellac layers. Though shellac is great for keeping any colors from bleeding due to capillary action of raw wood fibers.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  5. #15
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
    Posts
    206

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Wow. I would really like to see a picture of that project. Sounds really impressive. And, yes, a video of the process would be great.

    I'll have to take baby steps to achieve that kind of perfection. I'm sure your machine has much tighter tolerances than mine, but I do follow your theory. Thanks for sharing the process. I'll definitely try to locate some of the contact paper and see how it would work for me. The blue painter's tape worked out pretty well for this little experiment though. One thing I wold do the next time is to use a very light tooth brush or air gun to brush away all of the little bits of sawdust before spray painting the cut.

    Cool stuff. I asked my wife the other day if I could open a CNC sign shop and have that as my full time job because it's a whole lot more fun than what I really do. She said as soon as a sign shop would cover the mortgage and other living expenses. So, yeah, not going to happen anytime soon.


    Dan
    Last edited by Dan; 03-09-2013 at 10:26 pm.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  6. #16
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,100

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Well here's the threads involving my learning process on the one and only sign I've done so far - in chronological order:

    http://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/s...highlight=sign

    http://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/s...highlight=sign

    http://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/s...highlight=sign

    http://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/s...highlight=sign

    And if you're a "skip to the end" kinda guy, here's the finished piece:

    http://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/s...8006#post58006


    It was quite a ride - and I probably annoyed Leo a few dozen times in the process ... but it was fun and I think I can make the process work well.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  7. #17
    Join Date
    02-13-2013
    Posts
    206

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    I actually skimmed/read most of the forum links until I got to the end of your post that showed the link to the finished result. Nice job, my friend. So much more is learned through errors or mistakes than when everything works perfectly right out of the gate.

    If Leo wasn't so far away I'd ask him if I could pay him with copious amounts of his favorite micro brew in exchange for in person lessons.

    There are all kinds of things I want to try. It's a shame I can't run this machine in the late evening or wee hours due to noise.

    Dan
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  8. #18
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,100

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Ain't that the truth...

    I forget - where are you located?
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  9. #19
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Gods country -- New England
    Posts
    6,792

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    I actually skimmed/read most of the forum links until I got to the end of your post that showed the link to the finished result. Nice job, my friend. So much more is learned through errors or mistakes than when everything works perfectly right out of the gate.

    If Leo wasn't so far away I'd ask him if I could pay him with copious amounts of his favorite micro brew in exchange for in person lessons.

    There are all kinds of things I want to try. It's a shame I can't run this machine in the late evening or wee hours due to noise.

    Dan
    Leo like great coffee in limited amounts and he don't drink no beer
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  10. #20
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Gods country -- New England
    Posts
    6,792

    Re: F-Engrave - V Carve Question

    Travelin - is what we do.

    I will be travelin next week to get trained yet again. This time on a Citizen swiss turn citizen machine. After that I will be HEAVILY involved in teaching 3-4 people on HOW to efficiently operate swiss automatics.

    I DO teach.

    I will be flying into Indiana at the end of May for a sign making workshop.

    I think I will plan on going to the Vectric Convention in 2014 where ever it is held on the East Coast.

    So - you are all welcome to come to my shop to hang out for a bit.
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts