+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    10-02-2011
    Location
    New Paris, OH
    Posts
    68

    Showing movement in a carving

    I want to share with you a technique of a professional carver - Mark Yundt. His blog is here and shares it with Doris Fiebig.

    To show movement, use an 'S' form is used.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Untitled 0.jpg
Views:	238
Size:	75.9 KB
ID:	13309

    The flower stem has an 'S form and the leaves on the stem have an 'S' form. The leaf in the lower right corner has a double 'S' form in it. It is like the open book 'S' form. The form runs from side to side of the leaf, but the length of the leaf also has the form. When carving the leaf in relief, the depth of the leaf constantly changes, not much, but enough to give the allusion of movement. Relief carving relies on shadows cast from light striking the carving to produce the depth required to create a 3 dimensional type of carving.

    Now let's look at a vapor rising from a cup of coffee. The vapor is like a ribbon hanging in the air. The following sketch illustrates how I visualize the vapor.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Untitled 1.jpg
Views:	211
Size:	58.9 KB
ID:	13310

    Visualize a piece of ribbon suspended in air. It hangs straight up and down. Now push up on the bottom (or down from the top) and form an 'S' in the ribbon. In the illustration, the left side of the ribbon would be deeper in the wood than the right side. We've got movement and our eye sees a more 3 dimensional object. This is great for a ribbon, but vapor rises and twists, so let's put another 'S' in the ribbon. We twist it from one end. Can you see how much more movement is produced in this illustration? If we remove the ends of the ribbon and close them up with points, we have vapor rising.

    I want to carve this vapor in a chunk of wood to show you how it looks, but need a day or so to get to it. If you have any question, please post them and I'll try to answer them.
    ____
    Doug
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    05-31-2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    5,842

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Hey Doug - this is really great! The S curve concept is something that has escaped me in creating anything resembling reality ... very good tip.

    I've moved this thread into the General forum so that folks can reply and ask questions as desired. We can move it back to articles once it's been hashed through and expanded upon, if need be

    Thanks for posting this - love the information and the drawings!
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    10-02-2011
    Location
    New Paris, OH
    Posts
    68

    Thanks for the opportunity to share

    Quote Originally Posted by Beamer View Post
    Hey Doug - this is really great! The S curve concept is something that has escaped me in creating anything resembling reality ... very good tip.

    I've moved this thread into the General forum so that folks can reply and ask questions as desired. We can move it back to articles once it's been hashed through and expanded upon, if need be

    Thanks for posting this - love the information and the drawings!
    Jason, Thanks for moving this, I didn't think about replies. I hope there is a lot of hashing! I'll continue to expand on this.
    ____
    Doug
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    06-20-2010
    Location
    Gassaway, WV
    Posts
    1,972

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Doug nice to see your carving. I'm impressed. I have been thinking of dabbling in some carving and appreciate any info I can find. I remember you from when you lived in WV. M&M
    Fred
    http://steercreekwood.com/

    A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
    Location
    So. Florida
    Posts
    324

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Relief carving can appear as just a flat image. With the carving of the "depths" of the image, the conception of dimension plays into view. The use of an "S" enhancement to the image, adds a detail of reality to the carving. It becomes more natural. I think the idea of this thread can be seen in one of my carvings below, as in how I did the feather. In addition to that, the way the grain was caught to run through the feather and follow the hair and face.
    .


    .
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    10-02-2011
    Location
    New Paris, OH
    Posts
    68

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Belknap View Post
    Doug nice to see your carving. I'm impressed. I have been thinking of dabbling in some carving and appreciate any info I can find. I remember you from when you lived in WV. M&M
    Thanks Fred, and yep, I'm the guy from Buckhannon that never made it up to see you before I left. I've gotta go to Buckhannon sometime in September to do some computer work for the mission and hope to look you up! Thanks for the M&M!

    Quote Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
    Relief carving can appear as just a flat image. With the carving of the "depths" of the image, the conception of dimension plays into view. The use of an "S" enhancement to the image, adds a detail of reality to the carving. It becomes more natural. I think the idea of this thread can be seen in one of my carvings below, as in how I did the feather. In addition to that, the way the grain was caught to run through the feather and follow the hair and face.
    I cannot ever get the grain to follow what I'm carving, you've got more talent and foresight than I do. Nice carving.

    If it's okay with Mike (autobodyman), I'm going to carve the steam and a leaf to show how the 'S' shape translates in relief carving. It's true that it's difficult to mimic the movements of a hand with a CNC machine, but that's the challenge isn't it? After all, the computer is a really dumb tool and it's up to the programmer/software user to come up with a way to make it do what you want it too.

    The reason for a leaf as well as the steam is to show how much movement and apparent depth you can get with very little material removal.
    ____
    Doug
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    06-19-2010
    Location
    Gods country -- New England
    Posts
    7,892

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Doug - I love the post.

    The art is art no matter how its applied.

    The concept looks great -- "S"

    Now - I think I can apply that to a 3D model.
    The creativity and art is where is matters.

    I make a relief model of steam raising, similar to Mikes Coffee Cups. I didn't do the carving, due to time. The model looks good. I did get the sweeping "S" into it.

    Keep posting this stuff --- This is GOOD stuff.
    Art and Creativity - Collide with the Functionality of CNC - priceless
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    06-22-2010
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    2,967

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    I once had someone tell me "There are no straight lines in nature." I think your "S" concept illustrates why.


    You guys sure make me want to try my hand at carving.

    art
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    12-13-2012
    Location
    West Plains, MO, USA
    Posts
    103

    Re: Showing movement in a carving

    Quote Originally Posted by DougD View Post
    I want to share with you a technique of a professional carver - Mark Yundt. His blog is here and shares it with Doris Fiebig.

    To show movement, use an 'S' form is used.

    Attachment 13309

    The flower stem has an 'S form and the leaves on the stem have an 'S' form. The leaf in the lower right corner has a double 'S' form in it. It is like the open book 'S' form. The form runs from side to side of the leaf, but the length of the leaf also has the form. When carving the leaf in relief, the depth of the leaf constantly changes, not much, but enough to give the allusion of movement. Relief carving relies on shadows cast from light striking the carving to produce the depth required to create a 3 dimensional type of carving.

    Now let's look at a vapor rising from a cup of coffee. The vapor is like a ribbon hanging in the air. The following sketch illustrates how I visualize the vapor.

    Attachment 13310

    Visualize a piece of ribbon suspended in air. It hangs straight up and down. Now push up on the bottom (or down from the top) and form an 'S' in the ribbon. In the illustration, the left side of the ribbon would be deeper in the wood than the right side. We've got movement and our eye sees a more 3 dimensional object. This is great for a ribbon, but vapor rises and twists, so let's put another 'S' in the ribbon. We twist it from one end. Can you see how much more movement is produced in this illustration? If we remove the ends of the ribbon and close them up with points, we have vapor rising.

    I want to carve this vapor in a chunk of wood to show you how it looks, but need a day or so to get to it. If you have any question, please post them and I'll try to answer them.
    Thank You, Doug

    I eagerly await the next installment. This is a perfect example of why I'm here, to learn from the masters.

    Great stuff,

    Scott
    'Tis better to keep one's mouth shut and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all doubt.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  
    Share with Facebook  

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts