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Thread: Pine SLABS

  1. #1
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    Pine SLABS

    I have already heard about coating the slabs with CA. That is not an option as it would require 1/2 gallon to a gallon or more of CA.

    I cut down a couple of pines in the yard the past summer. I want to get a few decent slabs about 2 - 5 inches thick. I would like to keep the bark on.

    I have not yet cut the slabs.

    How should I go about preserving them and drying them.

    I want to use stuff I have around the house, like old paint and stuff. Mostly interior paint. I don't have any anchorseal, or even know where to get any.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    The simple thing to do is paint the ends (as logs) thoroughly with EXTERIOR latex paint (interior may not bold well enough to the end grain, and won't last in the outdoors). That'll hold 'em until/after you slab 'em up.

    After slabbing, be prepared to wait at least one year per inch of thickness for 'em to dry. Sticker well, especially big slabs. Protect from sunlight, but allow air to circulate freely around & through the stack.

    Good luck encouraging the bark to stay on. It USUALLY falls off as the wood dries & shrinks, but the bark doesn't shrink with it. Not always - sometimes the bark stays just fine. USUALLY it comes off, though.
    -- Tim --

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  3. #3
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Cut the trees down in the winter...oops, you cut them in the summer.

    Seriously, you will have a much better chance of retaining the bark if the trees are cut when the sap is down. You might also dust the slabs with borate to help control bugs. They are really bad when the bark is left on as they like to live just underneath the bark and munch away on your wood, loosening the bark in the process.

    For end coating, just about anything that will slow down the moisture release from the wood end grain will help...paint, finish, glue size, etc. It may not be optimum, but it will help. What you want to do is slow down the moisture loss to the same rate or less that it moves across the grain so that the slab dries evenly.

    Anchorseal is the best product I've found for sealing end grain. You can order it from UC Coatings if you ever decide you want some. Since you aren't a turner, a gallon would probably last you forever.

    I'll also be surprised if the wood isn't already blue stained and maybe even slightly punky. Pine does not last long in the elements unprotected...at least SYP doesn't.
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  4. #4
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Does pine sap go down in winter? I think all conifers keep their sap up all winter, unlike hardwoods.
    -- Tim --

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  5. #5
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Quote Originally Posted by TDHofstetter View Post
    Does pine sap go down in winter? I think all conifers keep their sap up all winter, unlike hardwoods.
    I think you're right.
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  6. #6
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Quote Originally Posted by Cody Colston View Post
    Cut the trees down in the winter...oops, you cut them in the summer.

    Seriously, you will have a much better chance of retaining the bark if the trees are cut when the sap is down. You might also dust the slabs with borate to help control bugs. They are really bad when the bark is left on as they like to live just underneath the bark and munch away on your wood, loosening the bark in the process.

    For end coating, just about anything that will slow down the moisture release from the wood end grain will help...paint, finish, glue size, etc. It may not be optimum, but it will help. What you want to do is slow down the moisture loss to the same rate or less that it moves across the grain so that the slab dries evenly.

    Anchorseal is the best product I've found for sealing end grain. You can order it from UC Coatings if you ever decide you want some. Since you aren't a turner, a gallon would probably last you forever.

    I'll also be surprised if the wood isn't already blue stained and maybe even slightly punky. Pine does not last long in the elements unprotected...at least SYP doesn't.

    It Ain't punky - it's just like it was when I cut it down. I cut off a couple of slabs today, and brought a piece of the trunk inside the shop, for resawing.

    I will post a couple of pics in a few minutes - I gotta go touch em up first.
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  7. #7
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Here are a couple of slabs - I will be cutting more over the winter.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	slabs.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	45.2 KB
ID:	3639
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  8. #8
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Oh, cheese - CHIPS. Crossgrain slabs. Diff'rent animal. Yeah, seal the end grain with paint or whatever... but they'll take a lot LONGER to dry than long-grain slabs because all the drying needs to be done outward through the "skin" (inner bark), which in this case is a slim ring instead of most of the outside. They'll try mightily to split, too - either star checks from the center out or ordinary checks from the outside in. Very very few woods are immune to that.
    -- Tim --

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  9. #9
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    Here are a couple of slabs - I will be cutting more over the winter.

    Attachment 3639
    Good luck.
    Cody

    "The reverence that the object maker has for the materials, for the shape, and for the miracle of his skill transcends to God, the Master Craftsman, the Creator of all things, who uses us, our hands, as His tools to make these beautiful things." Sam Maloof (1916-2009).
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  10. #10
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    Re: Pine SLABS

    Jeeze - that don't sound promising - maybe I will NOT cut more. Sounds like I gonna end up with firewood anyway.

    Maybe I will work on getting a long grained slab cut out.

    I have tried these "chips" before with no luck - but I never coated they with anything
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